Past Events

YDC Sharing Summit

24–25 October 2016

Connect, Reflect, Recharge!

YDC Sharing Summit 2016 Banner

This year's theme for the YDC Sharing Summit has multiple meanings. Connecting and reflecting are both key elements of the YuMi Deadly Maths approach to teaching mathematics.

Learning maths is about seeing the connections between different elements in order to build an understanding of these relationships or principles across the field of mathematics. By experiencing maths as a network of interconnected ideas, the subject matter becomes much easier to understand and to remember.

Reflection includes validating in the real world, applications and problem solving, and extension strategies like reversing and generalising, to ensure the maths is connected back to the students’ reality.

The Sharing Summit is also about connecting with each other, reflecting on progress over the past year, and recharging for the future.

Everyone is welcome to attend the summit to learn more about YuMi Deadly Maths and to connect, reflect, and recharge!

Download the 2016 YDC Sharing Summit program

Keynote speaker

Dr Chris Matthews, Griffith University and ATSIMA

Dr Chris Matthews is from the Quandamooka people of Minjerribah (Stradbroke Island) in Queensland, Australia. Chris has received a PhD in applied mathematics from Griffith University and is a Senior Lecturer at the Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University. Chris has undertaken numerous research projects within applied mathematics and mathematics education. He was the patron and expert advisor for the Make It Count Project, a large mathematics education project coordinating education research within clusters of schools across Australia with the specific aim of improving mathematics education for Indigenous students. Currently, Chris is the chair of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mathematics Alliance (ATSIMA) which aims to improve educational outcomes in mathematics for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander learners.

Presentation: The story of the Goompi Model

In this presentation, Chris will tell the story of the Goompi Model (also known as the RAMR Model). He will outline how the model was developed and the purpose the model was designed for. He will also provide examples of how he has been using the model to teach Aboriginal learners mathematics. These examples will highlight the ideas behind maths as dance and the maths of growing, as well as some early work with Yirrkala Community School, Northern Territory.

Watch the Sharing Summit highlights video

 

YDC Sharing Summit

26-27 October 2015

Diversity within YuMi Deadly Maths

The YDC Sharing Summit brings together education practitioners from schools across Queensland to share best practice and their experiences with YuMi Deadly Maths. Everyone is welcome to attend the summit to learn more about how YuMi Deadly Maths develops numeracy and mathematics understanding while catering for diversity.

If you would like to attend for individual sessions only, please contact Charlotte Cottier at c.cottier@qut.edu.au or 3138 0061 by 16 October.

Sharing Summit program

The full two-day program with abstracts is now available. Please note that this program is subject to change.

Keynote Speakers

Dr Elizabeth Tailby

EATSIPS: Embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Perspectives in Schools

This presentation will discuss EATSIPS and address the concept of challenging social norms in relation to Australia's First Nations Peoples. In the South East Region we, the regional Indigenous team, are taking a supporting role for schools where we use a school-centred approach to address the needs of each school and each cluster of the region. Supporting schools in this way is aimed at ensuring action is taken by schools. EATSIPS is more than the concept of curriculum content. We look at, among many things, providing mentors, building capacity of our Indigenous students, developing cultural capacity within our school staff and creating a generational cultural shift so that the development of the third cultural space becomes core business for schools and sustainable practice.

Marian Heard, Director, Indigenous STEM Education, Education and Outreach, CSIRO

Marian has been developing and managing national science education programs in Australia for over twenty years. As Education and Public Awareness Manager at the Australian Academy of Science, she initiated the highly successful Primary Connections program and at CSIRO, established the Scientists and Mathematicians in Schools program. Following a significant investment from the BHP Billiton Foundation to undertake a five-year project to improve the participation and achievement of Indigenous students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, she has recently taken on the exciting new role of Director, Indigenous STEM Education, with CSIRO.

Indigenous STEM Education - supported pathways to successful careers

With the support of the BHP Billiton Foundation, CSIRO is implementing a national education project aimed at increasing participation and achievement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Recognising the fundamental importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and identity in student achievement, a strong cultural, as well as a rigorous academic focus, is guiding the development, implementation and evaluation of the project. The project design has been informed by research and incorporates six separate elements which together cater to the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students as they progress through primary, secondary and tertiary education, and into employment.

Tracey Chappell, Principal Goodna Special School

Tracey has worked for over 20 years as a principal in special schools and for a short time in a primary school. She was a Teaching and Learning Auditor and has previously worked at ACARA. She has also worked in various projects within Education Queensland developing materials to support schools to engage in curriculum. Tracey began her teaching career in 1985 in primary, special and equivalent Special Education Programs.

YuMi Deadly Maths at Goodna Special School

YuMi Maths in a special school needs to be part of a strategic focus that ensures alignment of curriculum, teaching and learning, assessment and reporting. It must connect with all elements of the school's improvement agenda and DETE's School Improvement Hierarchy. It is a critical school journey and as such needs to have a clear vision with small steps guiding the process.

 

YDC Sharing Summit

27–28 October 2014

Download Sharing Summit program (PDF, 550KB)

YuMi Deadly Centre Sharing Summit

Transforming learning communities through YuMi Deadly Maths

The YDC Sharing Summit brings together education practitioners from schools across Queensland to share best practice and their experiences with YuMi Deadly Maths. Everyone is welcome to attend this engaging and informative summit to learn more about how YuMi Deadly Maths can transform learning communities.

YuMi Deadly Centre Sharing Summit

28–29 October 2013

YuMi Deadly Centre Sharing Summit

Doing Maths the YuMi Deadly way

The YDC Sharing Summit will bring together education practitioners from schools across Queensland and interstate to share best practice and their experiences with YuMi Deadly Maths. Everyone is welcome to attend this innovative and informative summit to learn more about doing maths the YuMi Deadly way.

 

Contacts

QUT YuMi Deadly Centre

Phone: +61 07 3138 0035
Fax: +61 07 3138 3985
Email: ydc@qut.edu.au

School of Curriculum
Faculty of Education
Queensland University of Technology
Kelvin Grove Campus
S Block, Victoria Park Road
Kelvin Grove, QLD 4059
Australia